MSc Sustainability and Adaptation

Course Structure

To obtain the MSc Sustainability and Adaptation students must complete the following:

  • A compulsory double module in September and November entitled Sustainability and Adaptation Concepts and Planning (30 credits)
  • Six optional modules from the choices available throughout the remainder of the academic year (or over two years if studying part time) (15 credits each, total of 90 credits)
  • A dissertation (60 credits)

A typical 15-credit module lasts eight weeks and students are expected to spend about 150 hours on study and assignments. Unless students are studying the module by distance learning it also includes a residential stay at CAT which typically lasts from Monday until Saturday (dates are listed below) - the time for this residential stay is included in the 150 hours for the module.

The standard course duration for the MSc Sustainability and Adaptation course is 18 months for full time (12 months of taught modules and the six-month dissertation module) and two-and-a-half years for part time (two years of taught modules and the six-month dissertation module).

On average a full time learner is expected to complete 150 hours of study per month (37.5 hours per week) and a part time learner is expected to complete 75 hours of study per month (18.75 hours per week).

Modules

  • September – Sustainability and Adaptation Concepts and Planning, Part 1 (core)
    Topics covered: environmental change and adaption, introduction to core module themes, future challenges and solutions, local to global.
  • October – Energy Flows in Buildings, Part A (option)
    Topics covered: complex nature of the relationship between occupant comfort, energy flows in buildings and energy efficient design. Heat flows, thermal comfort, ventilation, impact of moisture on building and occupant health, natural lighting, climate influence on design. Students who do not have prior learning or experience in building physics are advised to take this module before taking ‘Energy Flows in Buildings – Part B’.
  • November – Sustainability and Adaptation Concepts and Planning, Part 2 (core)
    Topics covered: environmental change and adaption, future challenges and solutions, local to global, ‘futuring’.
  • December – Environmental Politics and Economics (option)
    Topics covered: introductions to economics and politics from the sustainability perspective, climate policy, local social change, perspectives, future scenarios.
  • January – Energy Flows in Buildings, Part B (option)
    Topics covered: Energy and mass flows in buildings with regards to orientation and climate conditions, energy transfer calculations, building simulation modelling, analytical and critical appraisal of passive and energy efficient design, low energy building design, retrofit and adaptation.
  • February – Cities and Communities (option)
    Topics covered: urban environments, energy use, transport, green infrastructure, planning, mobility and access, urban food production, health and well-being.
  • March – Energy Provision (option)
    Topics covered: environmental and social benefits and limitations of energy provision options, including technology and energy reduction choices.
  • April – Ecosystem Services: Land-use, Water and Waste Management (option): 16/4/18 – 21/4/18
    Topics covered: ecosystem science, resources, water issues, food security, land use, flooding, carbon, sanitation.
  • May – Sustainable Materials in the Built Environment (option): 14/5/18 – 19/5/18
    Topics covered: environmental impacts, wider social and health implications, in-use performance and usability of materials. Hands-on practical experience of building materials.
  • June – Applied Project or Work-Based Project (option): 11/6/18 – 16/6/18
    A practical student-led project and report that will include statistical analyses of ongoing projects.  The ‘Applied Project’ is a group-work project devised and set by the module leader, delivered on-site at CAT or by distance learning. The ‘Work-Based Project’ is only available by distance learning. It is devised by the student in liaison with the module leader and is based on a project that they are undertaking in practice, for example in their workplace or in a volunteer position.
  • Dissertation (core)

 

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Course Dates 2018-2019

Download the Programme Specification 

Download the Course Handbook

 

Shorter courses

Students completing 60 credits at Level 7 (30 credits core module and two further 15 credit modules) would be eligible for a Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainability and Adaptation - apply online.

Students completing 120 credits at Level 7 (75 credits core module and three further 15 credit modules) would be eligible for a Postgraduate Diploma in Sustainability and Adaptation - apply online.

Many of the units are also available as stand-alone short courses. These are unaccredited but a great way to get a taster of the programme. Click here for more information and booking.

Get in touch

Sustainability and Adaptation Student Blogs

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Successful completion of the programme MSc Sustainability and Adaptation at the Centre for Alternative Technology leads to the award of Master of Science (MSc) by UEL

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Click here to read CAT's latest review report.

CAT has undergone a monitoring visit by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) and is awaiting publication of its final report.